VMA-331

VMA-331 Bumblebees

 

Point of Contact - Squadron Duty Officer (SDO)

Refer to the CONTACT LIST under "THE ASSOCIATION" drop down menu.


Courtesy of Elizabeth Johnston

Courtesy of Maxie Jarrell

Courtesy of Bob Herrman

Courtesy of Lynn Savage
 


Patch

  • VMA-331 has always used a patch displaying a Bumblebee riding a bomb and guiding itself with a bombing telescope sight. The bomb's shape and color change over the years but the basic patch remains the same.


Handle

  • 1943 to present - - - Bumblebees.
  • During WW-II Squadron personnel used the name "Doodlebug" for the squadron.


Heritage

  • 1 Jan 1943- - - - Marine Bomber Squadron 331 (VMSB-331) was commissioned at MCAS Cherry Point.
  • Oct 1944- - - - - VMSB-331 was redesignated VMBF-331
  • 30 Dec 1944 - - - VMBF-331 was redesignated VMSB-331
  • 21 Nov 1945 - - - VMSB-331 was disestablished
  • ca. 1954- - - - - VMA-331 was reestablished
  • ca. 1983- - - - - VMA-331 was ordered to Stand-down.
  • ca. 1986- - - - - VMA-331 was ordered to Stand-up. The squadron is presently operational.


Home Ports

  • Date - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Location:
  • 1943- - - - - - - - - - Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina
  • 195?- - - - - - - - - - Marine Corps Air Station Opa Loca, (Miami) Florida.
  • 1960- - - - - - - - - - Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, South Carolina.
  • Dec 1975 - Mar 1983 - - Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina


Air Wings

  • Date: - - Tail code - - Air Wing
  • 08 JUN 1964 to 13 MAR 1965: - AJ - CVW-8
  • 23 Jun 1970 to 31 Jan 1971: - AG - CVW-7


Deployments

  • Departure/Return Dates: - Tail Code - A/C - - Group- - Location - Operations Area.

  • 1959 (14 months): ??? - - - AD-6 - - ???- - - WestPac

  • June 1963: AJ A-4E - -CAG-8- - USS Forrestal;- - Carrier Qualifications

  • 24FEB64 to 08APR64: VL A-4E MAG31 MCAS Yuma for Training

  • 09APR64 to 18APR64: VL A-4E MAG31 MCRD P.I. (Page Field - SATS)

  • 08JUN64 to 18JUN64: AJ A-4E CAG-8 U.S.S. Forrestal for ORI and Carrier Quals

  • 10 July 1964 - 13 Mar 1965 - AJ 5xx- - A-4E- - CAG-8- - USS Forrestal - Mediterranean

  • JUN65 to 25AUG65: VL A4E- - MAG-31 - NS Roosevelt Roads, PR

  • 14SEP65 to 20OCT65: VL A-4E- - MAG-31 - Larissa, Greece - NATO Exercise

  • 30MAR66: VL- - - - A-4E- - MAG-31 - NS Roosevelt Roads, PR

  • MAR69 to 02 MAY 1966: VL- - - - A-4E- - MAG 31 - MCAS Yuma, AZ

  • OCT69: AG 3xx- - A-4E- - CVW-7- - USS Independence

  • FEB70: VL- - - - A-4E- - MAG 31 - MCAS Yuma, AZ

  • MAY70: AG 3xx- - A-4E- - CVW-7- - USS Independence

  • JUN70: VL- - - - A-4E- - MAG 31 - MCAS Yuma, AZ

  • 23JUN70 to 31JAN71: AG 3xx- - A-4E- - CVW-7 - USS Independence - Mediterranean

  • DEC73 to JUN74: VL- - - - A-4M- - MAG 31 ;NS Roosevelt Roads, PR



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Aircraft

 

  • Date Type First Received - - - - - - Type of Aircraft:
  • 1943 - - - - - - - North American SNJ Trainer.
  • 1943 - - - - - - - Douglas SBD (Speed-D-Bee) Dauntless.
  • 194? - - - - - - - Vought F4U-4 Corsair.
  • 1954 - - - - - - - Douglas AD-5 Skyraider.
  • 1959 - - - - - - - Douglas AD-6 Skyraider.
  • 15 July 1958 - - - Douglas a4d-2 (A-4B) Skyhawk *
  • 14 June 1963 - - - Douglas A4D-5 (A-4E) Skyhawk *
  • 8 December 1965- - Douglas A4D-2N (A-4C) Skyhawk *
  • 5 November 1970- - Douglas A-4M Skyhawk.
  • 1986 - - - - - - - ?????????
  • * November 30, 1962
    • The A4D-2 designation changed to A-4B
    • The A4D-2N designation changed to A-4C
    • The A4D-5 designation changed to A-4E
  • A-4 Skyhawk aircraft assigned to this unit:
    • Douglas A4D-2 (A-4B) Skyhawk
      • 142096 c/n 11350
        • 22 May 1960 - VMA-331 - NAS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
        • 18 Dec 1963 - Stricken - 41O9
      • 142098 c/n 11352
        • 22 May 1960 - VMA-331 - NAS Guantanamo, Cuba
        • 10 Nov 1960 - H&MS-14 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 142101 c/n 11355
        • 15 Jun 1960 - VMA-331 - NAS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba
        • 23 Jun 1961 - VA-125 - NAS Moffett Field, CA
      • 142102 c/n 11356
        • 31 May 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 30 Oct 1963 - Storage - NAF Litchfield Park, AZ
      • 142105 c/n 11359
        • 21 Nov 1961 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 Apr 1963 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142106 c/n 11360
        • 06 Jun 1960 - VMA-331 - NAS Guantanamo, Cuba
        • 31 Aug 1963 - NATFSI - NAS Lakehurst, NJ
      • 142109 c/n 11363
        • 27 Feb 1961 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 04 Jun 1961 - MARS NWSG-27 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 21 Nov 1961 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 24 Sep 1962 - HU-2 Det 3 NAS Jacksonville, FL

        • 30 Nov 1962 - VMA-331 - NS Roosevelt Roads, PR
        • 28 Feb 1963 - HU-2 Det 3 NAS Jacksonville, FL

        • 31 May 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 19 Jul 1963 - NPF - NAS El Centro, CA
      • 142110 c/n 11364
        • 27 Feb 1961 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 20 Jun 1961 - MARS NWSG-27 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 15 Dec 1961 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 Apr 1963 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142111 c/n 11365
        • 27 Feb 1961 - VMA-331 VL14 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 20 Jun 1961 - MARS NWSG-27 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 01 Dec 1961 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 Apr 1963 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142114 c/n 11368
        • 27 Feb 1961 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 20 Jun 1961 - MARS NWSG-27 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 01 Dec 1961 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 Apr 1963 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142116 c/n 11370
        • 31 Jul 1961 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 Oct 1962 - HU-2 Det 3 - NAS Jacksonville, FL

        • 27 Oct 1962 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 28 Feb 1963 - HU-2 Det 3 - NAS Jacksonville, FL

        • 31 May 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 21 Oct 1963 - NPF - NAS El Centro, CA
      • 142711 c/n 11773
        • 17 Sep 1962 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 07 Nov 1963 - VMA-533 - NS Roosevelt Roads, PR
      • 142728 c/n 11790
        • 19 Oct 1960 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 10 Nov 1960 - H&MS-14 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 142735 c/n 11797
        • 26 Oct 1960 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 29 Jul 1963 - H&MS-32 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142737 c/n 11799
        • 17 Apr 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, NC
        • 20 Aug 1963 - NAF RDT&E - NAF China Lake, CA
      • 142741 c/n 11803
        • 17 Oct 1960 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 10 Aug 1961 - MARS MWSG-27 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 142744 c/n 11806
        • 17 Oct 1960 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 04 May 1963 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142747 c/n 11809
        • 30 Nov 1960 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 Apr 1963 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142751 c/n 11813
        • 19 Oct 1960 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 26 Sep 1963 - H&MS-32 Sub 1 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142766 c/n 11828
        • 21 Sep 1962 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 11 Apr 1963 - Stricken - 1AA2
      • 142777 c/n 11839
        • 17 Apr 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 30 Nov 1963 - NAF RDT&E - NAF China Lake, CA
      • 142787 c/n 11849
        • 17 Apr 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 30 Nov 1963 - NAF RDT&E - NAF China Lake, CA
      • 142795 c/n 11857
        • 31 Mar 1962 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • Aug 1962 - Stricken - 1AA1
      • 142796 c/n 11858
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 29 Jun 1961 - VA-125 - NAS Moffett Field, CA
      • 142800 c/n 11862
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 17 Apr 1963 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142801 c/n 11863
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 28 Feb 1963 - HU-2 Det 3 - NAS Jacksonville, FL

        • 24 Apr 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 20 May 1963 - Stricken - 1AA1
      • 142802 c/n 11864
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • ?? Aug 1962 - Stricken - 1AA1
      • 142803 c/n 11865
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 19 Aug 1963 - H&MS-32 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142804 c/n 11866
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 31 May 1960 - Stricken - 1AA2
      • 142806 c/n 11868
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 30 Mar 1962 - Stricken - 1AA1
      • 142807 c/n 11869
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 Feb 1964 - NPF - NAS El Centro, CA
      • 142808 c/n 11870
        • 15 Jul 1958 - VMA-331 - MCAS Miami, FL
        • 01 Jun 1959 - H&MS-24 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 03 Aug 1961 - Stricken - 1AA2
      • 142809 c/n 11871
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 29 Nov 1961 - MCAS AES-12 - MCAS Quantico, VA
      • 142812 c/n 11874
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 31 May 1960 - Stricken - 1AA2
      • 142813 c/n 11875
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 31 May 1960 - Stricken - 1AA2
      • 142815 c/n 11877
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 16 Aug 1963 - H&MS-32 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142818 c/n 11880
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC 29 Nov 1961 - MCAS AES-12 - MCAS Quantico, VA
      • 142820 c/n 11882
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 30 Dec 1960 - VMA-533 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 10 Feb 1961 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 26 Apr 1963 - MARS-27 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 142821 c/n 11883
        • 07 Sep 1962 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 Jul 1963 - USNMC RDT&E - NAS Point Mugu, CA
      • 142829 c/n 11891
        • 14 Oct 1958 - VMA-331 - MCAS El Toto, CA
        • 02 Feb 1959 - O&R BUAER M&S - NAS Alameda, CA
      • 142833 c/n 11895
        • 05 Aug 1958 - VMA-331 - MCAS Miami, FL
        • 01 Jun 1959 - H&MS-24 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 31 May 1961 - Storage - NAF Litchfield Park, AZ
      • 142834 c/n 11896
        • 29 Aug 1958 - VMA-331 - MCAS Miami, FL
        • 01 Jun 1959 - H&MS-24 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 29 Nov 1961 - MCAS AES-12 - MCAS Quantico, VA
      • 142835 c/n 11897
        • 07 Aug 1958 - VMA-331 - MCAS Miami, FL
        • 01 Jun 1959 - H&MS-24 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 16 Aug 1963 - H&MS-32 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 142837 c/n 11899
        • 26 Oct 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 15 Jul 1963 - NATU - NAS Quonset Point, RI
      • 142839 c/n 11901
        • 31 Mar 1961 - VMA-331 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
        • 03 May 1961 - Stricken - 1AA2
      • 142853 c/n 11915
        • 04 Nov 1959 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 12 Aug 1960 - Stricken - 1AA2
      • 142888 c/n 11950
        • 26 Sep 1958 - VMA-331 - MCAS El Toro, CA
        • 10 Oct 1958 - VMA-121 - MCAS El Toro, CA
      • 144961 C/N 12207
        • 27 Sep 1962 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 20 Sep 1963 - NATC RDT&E - NAS Patuxent River, MD
      • 145008 C/N 12254
        • 17 Apr 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 21 Aug 1963 - H&MS-32 SUB 1 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 145034 C/N 12280
        • 10 May 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 Jul 1963 - USNMC - NAS Point Mugu, CA
      • 145047 C/N 12293
        • 10 May 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 19 Jul 1963 - NATC RDT&E - NAS Patuxent River, MD

    • Douglas A4D-2N (A-4C) Skyhawk
      • 145065 c/n 12311
        • 08 Dec 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
        • 15 Feb 1966 - VMA-214 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 147669 C/N 12433
        • 29 Jan 1966 - VMA-331 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
        • 30 Apr 1966 - VMA-233 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
      • 147793 C/N 12557
        • 15 Feb 1966 - VMA-331 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
        • 14 Apr 1966 - VMAAW-224 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
      • 147808 C/N 12572
        • 01 Mar 1966 - VMAAW-331 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
        • 17 Apr 1966 - VMA-214 - MCAS El Toro, CA

    • Douglas A4D-5 (A-4E) Skyhawk
      • 149647 c/n 12972
        • 27 Mar 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 24 Jan 1972 - VA-45 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 149648 c/n 12973
        • 14 Feb 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 05 Sep 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 20 Nov 1970 - Stricken - 1S
      • 149661 c/n 12986
        • 17 Jan 1970 - VMA-331 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
        • 12 Mar 1971 - VMA-211 - NAS Naha, Okinawa
      • 149664 c/n 12989
        • 13 Feb 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 149666 c/n 12991
        • 14 Feb 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 30 May 1972 - VA-45 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 149960 c/n 13013
        • 31 May 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 Sep 1966 - VA-76 - USS Bon Homme Richard
      • 149968 c/n 13021
        • 14 Oct 1966 - VMA-331 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
        • 28 Feb 1967 - VMA-121 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan

        • 28 Apr 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 07 Jan 1972 - VA-305 - NAS Point Mugu, CA
      • 149984 c/n 13037
        • 16 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 05 Jun 1970 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 149985 c/n 13038
        • 16 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Apr 1971 - VC-2 - NAS Oceana, VA
      • 149988 c/n 13041
        • 16 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 149989 c/n 13042
        • 22 Jun 1967 - VMA-331 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
        • 24 Aug 1967 - NAS COSA - NAS Atsugi, Japan

        • 29 Jun 1968 - VMA-331 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
        • 30 Jun 1968 - VMAAW-121 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 149994 c/n 13047
        • 14 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 14 Feb 1970 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 149996 c/n 13049
        • 23 Aug 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Feb 1967 - VA-46 - USS Forrestal
      • 150003 c/n 13056
        • 02 Apr 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 22 Mar 1972 - NARF - NAS Pensacola, FL
      • 150006 c/n 13059
        • 17 May 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 14 Sep 1966 - VA-212 - USS Bon Homme Richard

        • 30 Apr 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC (L)
        • Assume stricken - No further records found
      • 150016 c/n 13069
        • 25 Jun 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 15 May 1964 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 14 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Feb 1970 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150025 c/n 13078
        • 20 Oct 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Feb 1967 - VA-46 - USS Forrestal

        • 11 Jan 1968 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 06 Mar 1972 - NARF - NAS Pensacola, FL
      • 150031 c/n 13084
        • 25 Nov 1966 - VMA-331 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
        • 01 Mar 1967 - VMA-223 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam

        • 30 Jun 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 May 1972 - NARF - NAS Pensacola, FL
      • 150043 c/n 13096
        • 25 Jun 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 Jun 1964 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150044 c/n 13097
        • 19 Jun 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 Jun 1964 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150045 c/n 13098
        • 27 Jun 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 27 Jun 1964 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 24 Mar 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 19 May 1965 - Stricken - 1AA1
      • 150047 c/n 13100
        • 14 Jun 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 Jun 1964 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 01 Dec 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 08 Jul 1966 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 17 Oct 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 27 Feb 1967 - VA-46 - USS Forrestal
      • 150048 c/n 13101
        • 19 Jun 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 May 1964 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150051 c/n 13104
        • 10 Jul 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 May 1964 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150052 c/n 13105
        • 25 Jun 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 14 May 1964 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 25 Mar 1966 - VMA-331 - NS Roosevelt Roads, PR
        • 10 Sep 1966 - VA-212 - USS Bon Homme Richard
      • 150056 c/n 13109
        • 01 Jun 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 28 Feb 1972 - VC-1 - NAS Barbers Point, HI
      • 150059 c/n 13112
        • 29 Oct 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 Jun 1964 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150060 c/n 13113
        • 25 Jul 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 Jun 1964 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 19 Mar 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 07 Oct 1966 - VA-44 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 150061 c/n 13114
        • 14 Jul 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 14 May 1964 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 28 Feb 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 15 Jul 1965 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 10 Oct 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 15 Feb 1967 - VA-46 - USS Forrestal
      • 150063 c/n 13116
        • 22 Jul 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 14 May 1964 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 03 Nov 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 15 Feb 1967 - VA-46 - USS Forrestal
      • 150064 c/n 13117
        • 23 Jul 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 19 May 1964 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 28 Oct 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Feb 1967 - VA-46 - USS Forrestal
      • 150065 c/n 13118
        • 29 Oct 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 14 May 1964 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 12 Jul 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Feb 1967 - VA-46 - USS Forrestal
      • 150066 c/n 13119
        • 23 Jul 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 Jun 1964 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 18 Mar 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 07 Oct 1966 - VA-44 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 150068 c/n 13121
        • 31 Jul 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 14 Mar 1964 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 10 May 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Feb 1967 - VA-46 - USS Forrestal
      • 150081 c/n 13134
        • 14 May 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 12 May 1966 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 01 Dec 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 21 May 1970 - Stricken - 1S
      • 150082 c/n 13135
        • 14 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150084 c/n 13137
        • 14 May 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 19 Oct 1966 - VF-33 - USS America

        • 29 Nov 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 15 Feb 1967 - VA-46 - USS Forrestal
      • 150089 c/n 13142
        • 13 May 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 07 Oct 1966 - VA-44 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 150090 c/n 13143
        • 14 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150092 c/n 13145
        • 07 Mar 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 14 Mar 1972 - NARF - NAS Pensacola, FL
      • 150095 c/n 13148
        • 14 May 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 12 May 1966 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 16 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 28 Apr 1970 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150096 c/n 13149
        • 14 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 Aug 1967 - Stricken - 1S
      • 150098 c/n 13151
        • 04 Nov 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 May 1967 - Stricken - 1S
      • 150110 c/n 13163
        • 29 Oct 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 May 1964 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 14 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 05 Jun 1970 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150111 c/n 13164
        • 30 Oct 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 22 Jun 1964 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150114 c/n 13167
        • 14 May 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Apr 1965 - VA-44 - NAS Cecil Field, FL

        • 21 Apr 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Apr 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC (Last)
        • Assume stricken - No further records found
    • Douglas A4D-5 (A-4E) Skyhawk Continued)
      • 150115 c/n 13168
        • 28 Oct 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 02 Jun 1964 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 06 Jul 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 19 Oct 1964 - NAVSTA - NS Rota, Spain

        • 25 Feb 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Feb 1967 - VA-46 - USS Forrestal
      • 150118 c/n 13171
        • 28 Oct 1963 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 May 1964 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 08 Jul 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 15 Feb 1967 - VA-46 - USS Forrestal
      • 150123 c/n 13176
        • 14 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 150127 c/n 13180
        • 14 Mar 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 07 Oct 1966 - VA-44 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 150138 c/n 13191
        • 22 May 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 12 May 1966 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 13 Jun 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Aug 1971 - H&MS-13 - MCAS El Toro, CA
      • 151028 c/n 13198
        • 03 Jun 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 07 Jan 1972 - VA-45 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 151035 c/n 13205
        • 17 May 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 12 Oct 1966 - VA-93 - USS Hancock
        • 27 Mar 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 10 May 1971 - NARF - NAS Pensacola, FL
      • 151036 c/n 13206
        • 13 May 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 12 Oct 1966 - VA-93 - USS Hancock
      • 151038 c/n 13208
        • 14 May 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 21 Apr 1966 - VMA-332 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 151040 c/n 13210
        • 30 Mar 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 20 Dec 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 19 Nov 1972 - VA-45 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 151041 c/n 13211
        • 31 Mar 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 24 Apr 1970 - VMA-311 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
      • 151061 c/n 13231
        • 12 Jun 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Jun 1965 - VA-83 - NAS Oceana, VA

        • 14 Jun 1965 - VMA-331 - Greece
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 151066 c/n 13236
        • 30 Mar 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Feb 1972 - VF-101 Det Key West - NAS Key West, FL
      • 151072 c/n 13242
        • 22 Sep 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC

        • 20 Dec 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 15 Sep 1971 - VF-101 Det Key West - NAS Key West, FL
      • 151077 c/n 13247
        • 25 May 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 12 Oct 1966 - VA-93 - USS Hancock
      • 151086 c/n 13256
        • 23 Mar 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 28 Jan 1972 - VA-305 - NAS Point Mugu, CA
      • 151098 c/n 13268
        • 25 Feb 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 24 Apr 1972 - NARF - NAS Pensacola, FL
      • 151099 c/n 13269
        • 26 May 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 14 Oct 1966 - VA-212 - USS Bon Homme Richard
      • 151102 c/n 13272
        • 02 Jun 1964 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 12 Oct 1966 - VA-212 - USS Bon Homme Richard
      • 151105 c/n 13275
        • 15 Apr 1966 - VMA-331 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
        • 05 Oct 1966 - MAMS-37 - MCAS El Toro, CA
      • 151112 c/n 13282
        • 12 May 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 05 Oct 1966 - VA-212 - USS Bon Homme Richard
      • 151113 c/n 13283
        • 12 May 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 05 Oct 1966 - VA-212 - USS Bon Homme Richard
      • 151119 c/n 13289
        • 13 Apr 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 Jan 1966 - VMA-332 - NS Roosevelt Roads, PR

        • 05 Mar 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 05 Oct 1966 - VA-212 - USS Bon Homme Richard
      • 151120 c/n 13290
        • 23 Jun 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 11 Apr 1972 - VA-45 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 151121 c/n 13291
        • 07 Apr 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 17 May 1965 - VA-81 - NAS Oceana, VA
      • 151149 c/n 13319
        • 29 Dec 1968 - VMA-331 - Chu Lai, South Vietnam
        • 21 Mar 1969 - Stricken - 1S
      • 151163 c/n 13333
        • 23 Jun 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 16 May 1972 - VA-45 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 151177 c/n 13347
        • 01 Dec 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 151180 c/n 13350
        • 07 Apr 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 31 Jul 1970 - Stricken - 1S
      • 151195 c/n 13365
        • 13 Oct 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Sep 1967 - Stricken - 1S
      • 151196 c/n 13366
        • 24 Feb 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 29 Sep 1971 - Stricken - 1S
      • 151984 c/n 13372
        • 14 Nov 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 16 Apr 1970 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 151994 c/n 13382
        • 19 Feb 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 20 Feb 1972 - NARF - NAS Pensacola, FL
      • 152006 c/n 13394
        • 23 Nov 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 30 Mar 1970 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 152008 c/n 13396
        • 01 Dec 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 152010 c/n 13398
        • 23 Oct 1966 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 14 Feb 1970 - VMA-324 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 152011 c/n 13399
        • 17 Jan 1968 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 14 Oct 1970 - Stricken - 1S
      • 152012 c/n 13400
        • 29 Apr 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 15 Dec 1971 - VA-45 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 152065 c/n 13453
        • 02 Oct 1965 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 27 Oct 1966 - NARF - NAS Jacksonville, FL
      • 152067 c/n 13455
        • 13 Feb 1967 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Jun 1970 - H&MS-31 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
      • 152080 c/n 13468
        • 23 Jun 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 10 Apr 1972 - VA-45 - NAS Cecil Field, FL
      • 152097 c/n 13485
        • 23 Jun 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 11 Apr 1972 - VA-45 - NAS Cecil Field, FL

    • Douglas A-4m Skyhawk
      • 158150 c/n 14187
        • 30 Dec 1970 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Sep 1974 - Stricken - 1SO
      • 158151 c/n 14188
        • 20 Sep 1973 - VMA-331 - NAS Roosevelt Roads, PR
        • 23 Mar 1979 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 01 May 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1980 - VMA-223 - NAS Atsugi, Japan
      • 158153 c/n 14190
        • 05 Aug 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Mar 1979 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 14 Aug 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 31 Oct 1980 - Stricken - 1SO
      • 158158 c/n 14195
        • 05 Nov 1980 - VMA-331 - NAS Fallon, NV
        • 05 Nov 1980 - VMA-311 - MCAS El Toro, CA
      • 158161 c/n 14198
        • 27 Dec 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 12 Apr 1982 - VMA-331 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
        • 05 Aug 1983 - VMA-322 - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 158167 c/n 14204
        • 30 Oct 1974 - VMA-331 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
        • 20 May 1979 - VMAT-102 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
      • 158171 c/n 14208
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 13 Jan 1983 - HMS-49 Det So Weymouth - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 158174 c/n 14211
        • 01 Jun 1972 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 09 Sep 1980 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
        • 07 Jan 1983 - HMS-49 Det So Weymouth - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 158175 c/n 14212
        • 15 Sep 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 08 May 1973 - Stricken - 1S
      • 158176 c/n 14213
        • 03 Oct 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 20 Sep 1979 - VMAT-102 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
      • 158177 c/n 14214
        • 02 Oct 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 30 Oct 1972 - VMAT-203 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 158178 c/n 14215
        • 02 Oct 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 19 Jun 1979 - VMAT-102 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
      • 158179 c/n 14216
        • 22 Nov 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 22 Jun 1979 - VMAT-102 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
      • 158180 c/n 14217
        • 22 Nov 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 25 Jun 1979 - NATC RDT&E - NAS Patuxent River, MD
      • 158181 c/n 14218
        • 23 Nov 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 05 Dec 1978 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 22 Aug 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 01 Aug 1980 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 14 Jan 1983 - HMS-49 Det So Weymouth - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 158182 c/n 14219
        • 02 Dec 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 13 Aug 1979 - VMAT-102 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
      • 158183 c/n 14220
        • 02 Dec 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 05 Dec 1978 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 12 Oct 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 13 Sep 1980 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 07 Jan 1983 - HMS 49 Det South Weymouth - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 158184 c/n 14221
        • 30 Nov 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 08 Jun 1979 - VMAT-102 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
      • 158185 c/n 14222
        • 24 Feb 1972 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 23 Mar 1979 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 10 Oct 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 158186 c/n 14223
        • 22 Dec 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 01 Jun 1979 - VMA-214 - MCAS El Toro, CA
      • 158187 c/n 14224
        • 23 Dec 1971 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 18 Oct 1972 - VMAT-203 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 17 Aug 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 29 Jun 1980 - VMAT-102 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
      • 158188 c/n 14225
        • 01 Mar 1972 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 30 Nov 1974 - Stricken - 1SO
      • 158189 c/n 14226
        • 24 Jan 1972 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 20 Sep 1979 - VMAT-102 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
      • 158190 c/n 14227
        • 26 Jan 1972 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 26 Apr 1972 - Stricken - 1S
      • 158191 c/n 14228
        • 26 May 1976 - VMA-331 - NAF China Lake, CA
        • 26 May 1976 - VMA-311 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 26 May 1976 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1979 - VMA-214 - MCAS El Toro, CA
      • 158194 c/n 14231
        • 26 May 1980 - VMA-331 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
        • 26 May 1980 - VMA-311 - MCAS El Toro, CA

        • 22 Oct 1980 - VMA-331 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
        • 05 Nov 1980 - VMA-311 - MCAS El Toro, CA
      • 158415 c/n 14237
        • 10 Oct 1972 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 02 Aug 1980 - Stricken - 1SO
      • 158416 c/n 14238
        • 10 Oct 1972 - VMA-331 - MCAS Beaufort, SC
        • 28 Aug 1978 - VMA-311 - MCAS El Toro, CA
      • 158421 c/n 14243
        • 02 Aug 1980 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 159470 c/n 14411
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 Jan 1983 - HMS-49 Det South Weymouth - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 159472 c/n 14413
        • 10 Dec 1980 - VMA-331 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan

        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - Kadena AB, Okinawa, Japan
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 159475 c/n 14416
        • ?? Oct 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
        • 15 Jan 1983 - HMS-49 Det So Weymouth - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 159478 c/n 14419
        • 13 Aug 1980 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 159479 c/n 14420
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • ?? Oct 1982 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 159483 c/n 14424
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 26 Oct 1982 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 159484 c/n 14425
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 15 Jul 1983 - VMA-322 - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 159486 c/n 14427
        • 13 Aug 1980 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 159490 c/n 14431
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
        • 15 Jul 1983 - VMA-322 - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 160036 c/n 14538
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 02 Dec 1982 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160039 c/n 14541
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 23 Dec 1982 - HMS 49 South Weymouth - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 160042 c/n 14544
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
        • 20 Jan 1983 - HMS 49 South Weymouth - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 160045 c/n 14547
        • 16 Jan 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 15 Apr 1982 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 23 Dec 1982 - MAG 49 South Weymouth - NAS South Weymouth, MA
      • 160241 c/n 14584
        • 28 Mar 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160242 c/n 14585
        • 15 Jan 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 13 Aug 1979 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 29 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 02 Dec 1982 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160243 c/n 14586
        • 05 Apr 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 21 Aug 1979 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 02 Dec 1982 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160244 c/n 14587
        • 11 Mar 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 21 Aug 1979 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 12 Apr 1982 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160246 c/n 14589
        • 16 Jan 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 03 Aug 1979 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 31 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 02 Dec 1982 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160247 c/n 14590
        • 20 Jan 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 160248 c/n 14591
        • 21 Jan 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 160249 c/n 14592
        • 23 May 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 160250 c/n 14593
        • 11 Mar 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 14 Apr 1981 - Stricken - 1SO
      • 160251 c/n 14594
        • 25 Mar 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 160252 c/n 14595
        • 02 Jul 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 14 Aug 1979 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC

        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 28 Jan 1982 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160253 c/n 14596
        • 10 Jun 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 03 Aug 1979 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 28 Jan 1982 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160254 c/n 14597
        • 20 Mar 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 160255 c/n 14598
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 02 Dec 1982 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160256 c/n 14599
        • 19 May 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • ?? Jun 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160257 c/n 14600
        • 26 Mar 1980 - VMA-331 - MCAS Yuma, AZ
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 160258 c/n 14601
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 08 Feb 1983 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160259 c/n 14602
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 02 Dec 1982 - VMA-223 - MCAS Iwakuni, Japan
      • 160260 c/n 14603
        • 11 Mar 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 160261 c/n 14604
        • 20 Mar 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 160262 c/n 14605
        • 30 Mar 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 160263 c/n 14606
        • 21 Mar 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
        • 20 May 1981 - VMA-223 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 160264 c/n 14607 01 Mar 1979 - VMA-331 - MCAS Cherry Point, NC
      • 19 Jun 1979 - NWC - NWC China Lake, CA


Commanding Officers Date Assumed Command: - Commanding Officer.

 

  • 1943 - - - - - - - Captain R D Cox
  • 1943 - - - - - - - Major J L Beam
  • 1943 - - - - - - - Captain J A Feeley
  • 1944 - - - - - - - Major J C Otis
  • 1944 - - - - - - - Major P R Byrum
  • 1945 - - - - - - - Major J H Mceniry
  • 1945 - - - - - - - Captain P J Ebsen
  • 1945 - - - - - - - Major J H Stock
  • 1945 - - - - - - - Major W E Jewson
  • 1952 - - - - - - - Captain G W Curtis
  • 1952 - - - - - - - Captain C H Jones
  • 1952 - - - - - - - Ltcol J A Golchrist
  • 1953 - - - - - - - Major W T Porter
  • 1953 - - - - - - - Ltcol W L Gaffney
  • 1955 - - - - - - - Ltcol G F Vaughan
  • 1956 - - - - - - - Major E P Carey
  • 1956 - - - - - - - Ltcol C C Lee
  • 1957 - - - - - - - Ltcol E P Carey
  • 1959 - - - - - - - Ltcol J E Barnett
  • 1961 - - - - - - - Ltcol J C Prestridge
  • 1961 - - - - - - - Ltcol Don Conroy
  • 1963 - - - - - - - Ltcol S H Carpenter
  • 1965 - - - - - - - Ltcol R F Warren
  • 1966 - - - - - - - Ltcol G V Hodde
  • 1966 - - - - - - - Ltcol E K Jacks
  • 1967 - - - - - - - Major R L Critz
  • 1967 - - - - - - - LtCol C E Tucker (Chester Everett)
  • 9/13/1967 - - - - Lt.Col. P F Maginnis
  • 1968 - - - - - - - Major T M D'andrea
  • 1969 - - - - - - - Major F T Sullivan
  • 1971 - - - - - - - Ltcol J J Caldas
  • 1971 - - - - - - - Ltcol P E Brookshire
  • 1972 - - - - - - - Ltcol T D Brooks
  • 1973 - - - - - - - Ltcol S P Brutcher
  • 1974 - - - - - - - Ltcol D E Baker
  • 1975 - - - - - - - Major R L Wood
  • 1976 - - - - - - - Ltcol R B Savage
  • 1977 - - - - - - - Ltcol R H Ulm
  • 1978 - - - - - - - Ltcol S M Horton
  • 1979 - - - - - - - Ltcol M R Snedeker
  • Sep 1979-Jun 1981 -Ltcol M W Wehrung
  • 1981 - - - - - - - Ltcol J L Adkinson
  • 1983 - - - - - - - Standown
  • 1986 - - - - - - - Standup


Events

 

  • January 1943:
    Marine Bomber Squadron 331 (VMSB-331) was commissioned at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, Rhode Island. The Bumblebees were assigned the Douglas SBD Dauntless - Slow But Deadly - which the Squadron dubbed the Speed-D-Bee.

  • 1944:
    VMSB-331 flew the SBD in combat through the central Pacific islands, places such as Majuro Atoll or Nukufetau in the Marshall Islands.

  • May 5, 1960
    Crash took the life of 1stLt. Paul Leopold Drotch when A4D-2 BuNo 142813 slammed to the ground at NAS Guantamano Bay, Cuba.
    Rocky Mount, NC, Telegram, Monday, May 30, 1960
    Oakland, CA, Oakland Tribune, Sunday, May 29, 1960

  • May 16, 1960
    Lt. Eddie Smith was killed and Capt. Gerald Peterson later died when their jet aircraft crashed during takeoff for a training mission, at MCAS Beaufort. Probable mid-air collision with A4D-2 BuNo 142804 & A4D-2 BuNo 142812.
    Aiken, SC Aiken Standard and Review Tuesday, May 17, 1960
    Danville, VA The Danville Bee Wednesday, May 18, 1960

  • August 12, 1960
    Lt. Robert Roy Ladd who perished in A4D-2 BuNo 142853 in a short of runway landing accident at MCAS Beaufort, SC.
    The North Adams, MA, Transcript, Monday, August 15, 1960

  • 1961:
    I was in VMA 331 from Jul 57 until the spring of 62 just before I got orders to go to Fighters Weapons School at Nellis. We flew AD-5's at Opa Locka until the summer of 59 and then deployed to West Pac for 14 months where we flew the AD-6. We were the last AD Squadron in the Marine Corps. The Sqdrn. Flag was transferred back to MCAS Beaufort, SC. I was lucky enough to be one of two pilots who got to stay in the Sqdrn. We transitioned into the A4D-2. and spent about five months in 30 to 60 day increments in Gitmo and Rosie Rds. getting ready for the Bay of Pigs. I took a camera with me on most every flight.
    Ray Powell

  • 1962:
    VMA-331 deployed to Guantanamo (Leeward Point), Cuba during the Bay of Pigs and Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico during the blockade of Cuba.
    10 aircraft deployed to Gitmo and 10 to Roosevelt Roads during each incident.
    Two Skyhawks were lost during a two plane section take-off the day the Bumblebees left Beaufort for the Caribbean. A very gusty cross-wind blew the lead aircraft into the wingman.
    At Leeward Point a Skyhawk making a low level practice gunnery run hit the base perimeter fence. Another Skyhawk flew into the ocean off Viegas, Puerto Rico. No one was killed when a Squadron liberty run plane went in off the end of the runway and into the drink at St. Thomas.
    After these Caribbean escapades the Bumblebees became known as the "Suicide Squadron."

  • April 11, 1963
    1st Lt. Robert D. Miller was lost at sea during night flight operations aboard the carrier Forrestal 60 miles off the Virginia Capes. After a wave-off by the LSO the A-4B BuNo 142766 flew about two miles ahead of the Forrestal before flipping into the water and disintegrating.
    Muscatine, IA, The Muscatine Journal, Friday, April 12, 1963

  • 8 Jun 1964 - 18 Jun 1964: The Bumblebees accomplished 108 night carrier landings in 6 hours. This is believed to be the highest number of carrier qualifications in such a period aboard the Forrestal. The previous high was 89. (Naval Aviation News (Aug ’64, pg 33))

  • August 25, 1965
    Capt. Ben Summers ejected safely when his A-4E Skyhawk BuNo 150114 bound from Puerto Rico to Beaufort, SC crashed in the ocean and was rescued by Louis Jacob and Ronnie Black, from nearby Salerno, FL.
    Danville, VA The Danville Register, Thursday, August, 26, 1965

  • AUG 26, 1965: Jet Stream, the Beaufort Base Paper - August 26, 1965. Provided by Mike MacNealy via Norman Patterson

  • 1965: VMA-331 MED Cruise Information, provided by Mike MacNeal via Norm Patterson.
  • March 24, 1966
    Lt. Donald J. Beary ejected safely from his A-4 Skyhawk BuNo 150014 before it crashed near the Point of Marsh bombing range at the mouth of the Neuse river (Cherry Point, NC).
    Danville, VA The Register, Friday, March, 24, 1966

  • August 18, 1967:
    Capt. Mike Donovan ejected to safety before his A-4E BuNo 150096 crashed in the Rustin, MS community 20 miles from Laurel, MS while on a training mission from MCAS Beaufort, SC. His wingman, Capt. Peter Erenfield, landed safely at Laurel, MS airport with instruments indicating low engine oil.
    Laurel, MS, Leader-Call, Tuesday, August 22, 1967.
    Laurel, MS, Leader-Call, Saturday, August 19, 1967.
    Laurel, MS Leader-Call, Saturday, August 19, 1967.

  • September 13, 1967:
    VMA-331 CO LtCol. C. E. Tucker (Chester Everett) perished in A-4E Skyhawk BuNo 151195. Details unknown.
    LtCol Paul Mcginnis assumed command and kept VL 02 "The Muscle Bee" as his plane for his entire tour.

  • May 21, 1970:
    Flying A-4E 150081 Maj. Bob Blackington ejected right after launch from CVA-62 USS Independence due to a control malfunction.
    From John Caldas.

  • June 23, 1970 - January 31, 1971:
    VMA-331 flying A-4E Skyhawks deployed to the Mediterranean on CVA-62 USS Independence.

  • July 31, 1970:
    Lt. Ken Heitel (USMC) had a hook skip in A-4E BuNo 151180 and when he added throttle he couldn't get a positive rate of climb. The Skyhawk settled slightly and Ken ejected and was picked up by the Angel without injury.

  • October 14, 1970:
    Lt. Rodney Smith (USMC) was killed when he crashed A-4E BuNo 152011 at sea during night bombing practice.
    El Paso, TX El Paso Herald-Post, Saturday, October 19, 1970.

  • November 20, 1970:
    Flying A-4E BuNo 149648, Capt. Les Herman ejected from AG-311 when his engine failed on the cat shot. He was recovered by the HS-2 Angel and was back on deck 7 minutes after launch.
    From John Caldas
     
  • 1970 MED: Med Cruise pdf

  • September 29, 1971:
    1st. Lt. D. A. Williams was killed when his aircraft crashed during a training mission at the Naval Target Facility, Camp Blanding, FL.
    Danville, VA, The Bee, Thursday, Sept. 30, 1971.

  • 1972:

    From Lee Jackson

  • September 23, 1974
    1st Lt. David Leonard King was killed when his A-4M BuNo 158150 crashed on a training mission near Yuma, AZ.
    Des Moines, IA, Des Moines Register, Thursday, September 26, 1974

  • November 30, 1974:
    1st Lt R. H. Dobrow ejected but was killed when his A-4M BuNo 158188 crashed and exploded west of Ariton, AL while on a flight from Pensacola to Cherry Point, NC and then to Beaufort.
    Bill Ezell
    Fort Walton Beach, FL, Playground Daily News, Monday, December 2, 1974
    US Navy Accident Report (PDF File)

  • 1976: Provided by Norman Patterson

  • April 14, 1981
    The date that shall go down in infamy was 14 Apr 1981. THAT was the date I (Capt Rodney “Pink” Panter) deep sixed BuNo 160250 after an engine failure. The engine failed during the climb passing ~15,000ft MSL after takeoff from runway 05 at Kadena AFB. And here is MY story:

    It all began that day in VMA-331 Maintenance Control. While I was reading the maintenance history of the aircraft I noticed multiple write-ups for strange engine noise and vibrations. Whereupon I asked the MC Officer (CWO Wayne Paulson) in no uncertain terms what’s up (or WTF Over)? Wayne went on to say that several pilots had complained about the noises and vibrations, but maintenance could not identify any specific problem. BUT Wayne did go on to say that the (blade creep???) tolerances for acceptable limits had recently been relaxed by competent authorities??!! Soooo…I asked Wayne (several times) is the A/C up or down, and he said it was up to me whether I wanted to take it or not? When I pressed him for an Up or DOWN answer…..His final answer was UP. And being the MAN that I was, as well as a WELL SEASONED Marine Aviator, I therefore decided to SEE FOR MYSELF what’s up!?

    Capt. Bob Conser (Cosnuts…aka Cos) was the Section Leader that day ( I believe he is now a Fed Ex pilot). He lead our flight of 2 A-4Ms from MCAS Iwakuni Japan down to one of the ranges off the east coast of Okinawa for some LATT work combined with low level bombing. All went well on that first sortie with no unusual noises or vibrations, which Cos continually checked as the good section leader he was but Ad Nausea to me!

    We landed for fuel and lunch at Kadena AFB in Okinawa. Cos hand lunch (or funch?) with his fiancée/girlfriend (Leslie Williams???), and I headed off to the exchange for some wonderful hotdog fair or the like. Cos and I met up (at base operations?), where he asked me if I minded if he stayed behind to visit with his girlfriend. I said I did not mind at all, but we needed to get approval to conduct single aircraft operations from Kadena (Okinawa) back to Iwakuni (Japan). Cos called, got the approval, and he was on his way.

    I headed off on my own (in a BIG hurry) to get back to Iwakuni. I remember my preflight was thorough, but fast. Soon I was airborne, having taken off from runway 05 at Kadena. Shortly after takeoff, passing through about 15,000 ft., came a loud explosive bang….as if sledge hammers had hit the inside of the intakes!! I then pulled the RAT for power.

    I immediately declared an “engine failure” emergency with the Kadena controller, who then asked me to descend and maintain something and whereupon I told him I could descend but I could not maintain anything since I had ONLY ONE ENGINE. The controller’s voice then when up at least one octave (I later learned this was the first emergency for this rather new controller…, and I still have the taped conversation!). I then started a turn back to Kadena, with the intention of landing on runway 23. By the time I completed the turn back to Kadena I was approximately 25 miles from the runway and still near 15,000 ft. Just enough altitude I thought to be able to glide back to the runway for an emergency landing. The engine instruments showed a low RPM with a high EGT, but within limits. Never the less, with no visible smoke in sight, I tried to restart the engine several times while on my way back to Kadena, and still rapidly descending.

    I was paralleling the coastline on my right on my way back to runway 23, and considering my options. It was becoming apparent that I was NOT going to have enough speed and altitude to make a safe emergency landing at Kadena. Knowing that 200kts and 2,000 ft AGL was somewhere near the heart of the ejection envelope, I decided to abandon my runway attempt in favor of turning the A/C to the right (90 degrees to the coastline) to DEEP SIX the A/C in the water, avoiding injuries to anyone on the island. I informed Kadena of my intentions and they said they had me on RADAR. Shortly thereafter, I turned the A/C ~ 90 degrees to take the A/C out to water and began to arrest my rate of descent, shooting for 200kts, 2,000 ft AGL and zero rate of descent before ejecting. About that time Kadena asked for a TACAN cut just to confirm my position, and at that point I was less than 10 miles from Kadena. They said the rescue helicopter was on its’ way.

    The ejection went as planned, though the rate of deceleration was a bit faster than I had anticipated. It seemed as though my body had rotated forward just prior to chute opening, and when it opened….WHAM…my feet flew in front of me as I was rolled backward by the chute. When I looked up to confirm a good chute, I unexpectedly dropped the upper handle, which I had used during the ejection. Using the upper handle meant I could not “witness” my own ejection, but I decided that was the route for the fewest injuries (I had none except for my slightly bruised groin from the harnesses RAPID tightening during parachute opening process).

    As I turns out, there WAS someone on the ground who DID witness the evolution as I crossed the beach and ejected. Apparently, there was an Air Force (name/rank unknown) gentleman who was somewhat of a military aircraft aficionado, and he had never seen an A-4M with “afterburners”! According to this gentleman, who provided his information to the accident investigation team lead by Major Randy (Tattoo) Justice, the aircraft had flames greater than the length of the aircraft coming from the tailpipe?!! He had taken pictures of the beach crossing and provided them to Tattoo. Unfortunately, I failed to get a copy of the photos.

    Well, by now I was on my way down to the water, so I actuated the handle on the right side of the seat pan to release the life raft. It worked just FINE, and I observed the fully inflated life raft below. When it touched the water, I prepared for water entry just a few seconds later. Once in the water, I pulled myself to the raft, attached the safety strap (to prevent the raft from floating away should I lose my grip of it), released the upper portion of the seat pan to preclude damage to the raft, and entered the raft.

    Once safely in my watertight raft, and feeling somewhat proud of myself for getting it all done just as they taught me in Water Survival, I pulled out my PRC (aka Prick) and began “trying” to signal the rescue helicopter (or Copter)….which I knew was headed my way, at least according to the new Kadena controller. And after a short while, a copter DID arrive on the scene. I “tried” to communicate with him, but as it turns out I was using the wrong button on the Damn Prick (So much for MY survival preparation of which I was Sooo proud of myself!). And much to my surprise, after circling at around 5,000 ft for just a few minutes, he took off down the coast leaving me behind!! The STORY IS, he had a full load of Chaplains and could not take on another soul, but THEY were all praying for the one they left behind! It also turns out, he was in communication with THE rescue copter that had been given the wrong coordinates by the new controller.

    The real rescue copter (the Air Force version of a CH53??) arrived several minutes (15 -20?) later, for which I popped my smoke for him to get a visual on me and so he would know the direction of the wind for his approach (once again exhibiting my water survival skills!). He approached like a mobile hurricane, blowing the hell out of the water and me, and dropped a rescue swimmer who immediately swam to my side. The rescue swimmer asked me if I was OK, and I was, and then he asked me to get out of my raft to initiate the recovery. I of course said HELL NO….there are Great White Sharks in these waters (a fact that was verified by Cos later that day!). The rescue swimmer then informed me that they could not affect the recovery if I did not leave the raft behind, since it could be ingested by the copter’s blades. This of course made perfect sense to me (the Intrepid Naval Aviator but clearly the trepid swimmer shark enthusiast).

    So…I left the relative safety of my raft behind, with the rescue swimmer leading the way. Once we were clear of the raft and the copter could approach without risking ingesting my raft, he came and dropped his jungle penetrator. Not knowing where the palm trees were, I asked the rescue swimmer “why the penetrator”, and, if I recall correctly, he said that was all they had that day. So we both CROWDED on to that penetrator for our ride up to the copter. On our way up we began to swing from side-to-side, a motion that became more frequent and prominent as the length of the cable shortened. It became clear to me that we were going to hit the bottom of the copter if we did not slow or stop our rate of ascent (something the rescue swimmer did not mind or was unaware of!) so I gave the cut signal, waving my hand with fingers extended across my throat, to the winch operator. He stopped the retraction and allowed the pendulum motion to subside, and then continued to haul us up and in to the copter.

    Once inside, I began to remove my harness, but I was stopped by the other crewman (apparently THAT was their job…for my safety). I was then instructed to take a seat on one of the benches along the side. One of the other crewmen then stood up in front of me and began to attempt to remove my harness (the tactical jet harness with the parachute harness and emergency survival vest combined). He clearly was unfamiliar with this type of “combined” vest and after several unsuccessful attempts to remove it he took out a large survival knife and began to “try” to cut the central strap across the chest (and below my neck). Using his knife in this fashion to cut my very tough harness just seemed a bit too risky for me, with his knife ready to cut my throat should he slip. So I decided to take things into my own hands. At that point I stood up, took his knife hand and forcefully removed it from my presence, giving him the visual signal (we could not talk) to Back Off. He did back off, quite surprised by my response, and I then removed my harness by releasing the material from the central buckle, still uncut.

    Soon we arrived at the hospital, where I had the opportunity to endure all manner of indiscretions, including having my bruised and naked groin photographed for posterity in the presence of many PRETTY nurses, which I normally would not have minded (I told the photographer I would sue if I found the pictures in Playboy….a “not so” fat chance!)! About that time Cos arrived, and I demanded a Rum and Coke. It seems I was concerned the blood alcohol test might not prove to be in my favor, since I had been up late the night before with Mike “Cherokee” Colliers. The name says it all, and the blood test was negative for I had metabolized all of the evidence of my possible intrusion on the military’s 12 hour limit long before. In any case…Cos could not provide the necessary solution and nerve calming R&C, which would have to wait for at least another 24 hours.

    After all of the X-Raying, prodding and photographing, I was FINALLY shown to my abode for the night. A bed in the middle of an open hospital ward, with the guy across from me wearing a “halo” to protect his broken neck…which he achieved by blindly diving into a local swimming hole with a BIG rock hidden just below the surface (and most certainly after visiting his local watering hole). So there I was at approximately 2100 and STILL in my salt water infused flight suit in a room full of moaning “guests” and NO DINNER as of yet…and NO R&C!

    When the nurse on the ward discovered I had not eaten since my visit to the exchange at noon that day, and after my exhilarating rocket ride, she went down to the galley and brought back a cold ham and cheese sandwich for me and a carton of MILK. No matter, it tasted GREAT. But that still did not stop me from complaining when she attached the heart monitor to me, which prevented me from rolling over on my side like I love to do when I sleep. So I decided to have some fun with her, since I could not sleep, and disconnected the monitor causing it to alarm her in her “window” view office at the end of the ward. She was NOT amused, and I discontinued my naughty behavior to preclude another assault. And that might have been why she so diligently performed her duties throughout the night, which included taking my vital signs…..every hour on the hour! It was NOT a good night.

    When the sun came up the next day, I was READY to leave, but much to my dismay the Air Force Flight Surgeon would NOT authorize my release. He said he wanted to keep me for another 24 hours to observe my vital signs for stress, and THAT caused me much stress. I begged him to get in touch with my squadron’s Flight Surgeon, and he promised to do so. As the squadron’s Aviation Safety Officer, I knew the accident investigation team, including the Flight Surgeon, would soon be nearby. In the meantime, I intended to shower off the salt from my swim the day before.

    When I attempted to enter the men’s shower room to shower myself, I was abruptly stopped by the nurse then on duty. I was NOT allowed to get out of my bed. I protested, complaining about the salt being an irritant. What could she say? She relented on the grounds that a nurse (all female) HAD to observe me while I was in the shower. Normally, this would NOT have been a problem for me if I had been allowed to choose the nurse, but that was out of my jurisdiction and I was stuck with the nurse (not too cute) assigned. So once again I protested (somewhat more mildly this time), and it was agreed the nurse could monitor my progress from just outside the men’s shower room door.

    By the time I was all prettied up, my NAVY Flight Surgeon had arrived to RESCUE me, and God knows I needed rescuing. He spoke one-on-one with the Air Force Flight Surgeon and PROMISED not to let me out of his sight until he was convinced I would be OK. The Air Force Flight Surgeon BOUGHT IT, and I was free to go with my NAVY Flight Surgeon!!! I wish I could remember his name because I owe him for saving my life!!! Er well…at least my evening.

    As we left the hospital the Flight Surgeon asked me what I would like to do, and I promptly replied that I would like to go get Shit Faced! He agreed. So we left for the Bachelor Officer’s Quarters where the rest of the accident investigation team had been quartered, and where my duds for the night had been delivered (Thanks Tattoo).

    Later that night while Out On the Town and drinking heavily, the Flight Surgeon asked me if I felt OK. Of course by that time I was feeling GREAT, so he and most of the rest of the team departed. They would be busy for the next few weeks discerning the details of my adventure. They never determined the cause of the engine failure. Tattoo later wrote the following using a black felt tipped pen in my flight log book “ENGINE FAILED DUE TO UNKNOWN CAUSE. Pilot Ejected; acft lost at sea”.

    My story was briefly mentioned by Paul Harvey during his WGN (a Chicago, Il station) Paul Harvey Comments the next day. The reasons for the honorable mention of my story by Paul Harvey were most likely twofold: the copter that rescued me was ”On Call” just in case the first space shuttle Columbia was forced to land at Kadena AFB, an alternate landing site (Instead it returned safely to the dry lakebed runway at Edwards AFB on April 14, 1981): and the fact that I was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps after graduating from Northwestern University in Evanston, Il just north of Chicago in June 1975.

    A few years later in 1997 (?) I had the opportunity to take a weekend Sabreliner (CT-39G) “training” mission with Major (Ken?) Walsh, who had been an A6E pilot prior to his arrival at MCAS El Toro, which is unfortunately now closed. During that weekend we had countless hours to tell lies and other stories, when he began to tell me about an unusual engine failure he had experienced while flying the A6E, which had the same Pratt & Whitney J52-P-408 engines as the A4-M. He explained in vivid detail how the engine seemed to explode in the intake, and how the RPM was low while the EGT was high, but within limits. Everything he said was just as I had experienced it 16 years earlier. And since he had TWO of these wonderful engines, he was able to safely land the airplane and maintenance was able to determine the cause of the engine’s failure after a brief investigation.

    Ken then called his Dad and (playfully) asked him “Are you trying to kill me?”. As it turns out, the engine’s inlet guide vanes had failed causing catastrophic engine failure. Ken’s Dad was the P&W engineer who had designed the PW J52-P-408 inlet guide vanes.

    I had achieved full closure, thanks to the anonymous Air Force photographer…..and…… to Ken’s Dad.



  •  
  •  

 


Awards Award and Inclusive Dates:

 

 

  • 8 Jun 1964 - 18 Jun 1964: The Bumblebees accomplished 108 night carrier landings in 6 hours. This is believed to be the highest number of carrier qualifications in such a period aboard the Forrestal. The previous high was 89. (Naval Aviation News (Aug ’64, pg 33))
  • 1990: The Bumblebees were selected by the Marine Corps Association as the "Attack Squadron of the Year."

 

 

Photographs


VMSB-331 Gunners - 1943.
Tom Johnston (whose buddies have their arms across his shoulder) is top row, third from the left. The man seated behind the cowl was the head of the gunners, Frank Tackack.

A Marine SBD-3 Dauntless - 1943.
Marine Bombing Squadron THREE HUNDRED THIRTY-ONE SBD-3 Doodlebug "Speed-D-Bee" probably piloted by Captain Frank Wright with rear Gunner Tommy Johnston looking for something to bomb near the Marshall Islands in the central Pacific. This pair flew more than 150 combat sorties together in the Pacific war.
Official Marine Corps Photograph from Elizabeth Johnston.

A Marine F4U-4 Corsair.
Marine Attack Squadron-331 F4U-4 Corsair piloted by Maxie Jarrell taxis down the airstrip at Roosevelt Roads Puerto Rico prior to a simulated combat mission in support of Marine ground units. The Marine aviation squadron is participating in Lant Tracx 2-54 maneuvers held in the Puerto Rican area. The Squadron is a unit of Marine Air Group - 31, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, Marine Corps Air Station, Miami, Florida.
Official Marine Corps Photograph.

VMA-331 "Bumblebee" Marine Corsairs - 1954.
Flying over the McArthur causeway at Miami in 1954, either April 5th or 9th.
Official Marine Corps Photograph. Photo "AD-5" Aircraft piloted by Captain Frank E. Sturges USMCR.

VMA-331 Marine Corsairs - 1954.
Flying a combat spread off the coast of Miami in 1954, either April 5th or 9th.
Official Marine Corps Photograph. Photo "AD-5" Aircraft piloted by Captain Frank E. Sturges USMCR.

VMA-331 "Bumblebee" Marine Corsairs - 1954.
Flying a "V" formation off the coast of Miami in 1954, either April 5th or 9th.
Official Marine Corps Photograph. Photo "AD-5" Aircraft piloted by Captain Frank E. Sturges USMCR.

A four section Corsair Bumblebee flight - 1954.
off the coast of Puerto Rico during an exercise in l954. The maintenance guys deserve all the credit for getting sixteen planes into the air at one time!
Official Marine Corps Photograph.

April 1954 -- The last active F-4U 'Corsair'
leaves the Miami Opa-locka Marine Corps base. Col. Richard A. Beard Jr., Commanding Officer of Marine Air Group 31, 3rd Marine Aircraft Wing, and other officers turned out to see pilot Lieutenant David Teichmann depart. Corsairs, once standard equipment for Marines and a familiar sight over Miami, now have been replaced by newer and faster jet planes.
The last of the Marine Corps active Corsairs -- the "gull-wing" fighter which accounted nearly 1,400 enemy planes in the Pacific war -- was flown today from Miami to Quonset Point, Rhode Island, for service in a reserve squadron. The Navy Department announced in January, 1953, that it was accepting delivery of the last of the propeller-driven fighters, and the old planes now have been replaced by jets.
Official Marine Corps Photograph.

Circa 1960: Last of the ADs in the Marine Corps.
Ray Powell

Circa 1962: A4D-2s in training.
Ray Powell

Circa 1962: A4D-2s in training.
Ray Powell

Circa 1962: A4D-2s in training.
Ray Powell

MAY 1962: BuNo 142815, VL-13, parked on the ramp with JATO bottles and 18 250 pound bombs.
Bob Mikesh

Skyhawk A-4B - 1962.
A Bob Herrman photographic study of an A-4B Skyhawk taken October 12, 1962, flying toward the practice target off Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, prior to deploying to Guantanamo, Cuba for the missile crisis. Bob was later killed in an airshow crash in California.

Skyhawk A-4E BuNo. 150095 - 1964.
Bob Herrman's photographic study of a November 4, 1964, section tactics flight off the USS Forrestal (CVA 59). The pilot of the VMA-331 Skyhawk was Lt. Donald E. Gough (later a TWA Captain) who, along with his wife were lost on TWA Flt 800.

A-4E Skyhawks - 1964.
Bob Herrman photographic study of a flight of four Skyhawks off the Forrestal on a high/low high practice strike mission into Spain in October of 1964.

A-4E BuNo 150066 - June 1966
The VMA -331 pix is an A4E, part of Mag 31 in Beaufort. They were called the Bumblebees, and the rudders were painted yellow and black. This is the first squadron I was assigned to after getting my wings from Kingsville in June 66. My first CO was Dick Critz, followed by LCol Tucker, and then Paul Maginnis (moved up when Tucker died in the crash).
Bill "Frog" McVey

BuNo.150089, 150138 and 151038 aboard the Forrestal in 65-66
Photo by Tony Redman

19 August 1967: VMA-331 Bumblebees A-4E Skyhawk BuNo 150090, VL-2. P/c is Cpl. W.D. Schultz.
Official U.S. Navy photo.

1968: VMA-331 Commanding Officer Lt.Col. Paul Maginnis dis-mounts from Skyhawk VL-02 of VMA-331.
Col. Paul Maginnis USMC (Ret) via Jason Maisch,

JUL 1968: Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 151072, VL-3, assigned to MAJ Silars as she taxies by the photographer. USAF MAC C-141A Starlifter s/n 64-0616 in the background.
R.M. Hill

Late 60s:
VMA-331 151072,
photographer & location unknown (could be MCAS Beaufort).
Photographer unknown, from G. Verver

Punch Out - 1970.
Lt. Ken Heitel had a hook skip and when he added throttle he couldn't get a positive rate of climb. The Skyhawk settled slightly, and Ken punched out. Ken was picked up by the angel without injury. This happened in the fall of 1970 on the USS Independence CVA-62.
Photograph from the Naval Aviation News October 1970.

Nov 1972 left front view of Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 158150, VL-3, parked on the flight line.
Gary Verver Collection

May 1974 Bumblebees Skyhawks BuNo 158178, VL-12, and BuNo 158182, VL-19.
Harry Gann

Sept 1974 158416, VL-22, on the flight line being serviced by the ground crew.
Photo by Don Spering, G. Verver collection

27 FEB 1975 Skyhawk BuNo 158415, VL-2, as she leaves the deck of the Kenendy.
U.S. Navy photo

1976 BuNo 158185, VL-10.
Harry Gann

VMA-331 MAG-32 A-4M Skyhawks
Two A-4M Skyhawks, VL 00 BuNo 158167 and VL 17 BuNo 158151, on a Nevada gunnery range unloading their rockets.
Photograph from Major Fred Miclon.

1977: VMA-331 Bumblebees A-4M Skyhawk BuNo 158180, VL-14. on the ramp with a pair of drop tanks.
Photographer unknown.

VMA-331 Snake-Eyes - 1978
In 1978, Douglas Tech. Rep. Harry Gann visited a VMA-331 Detachment training at Naval Air Station Fallon, Nevada. The Bumble Bee detachment had come from Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, North Carolina for live weapons training. Harry hitched a ride in a TA Skyhawk to snap this impressive photograph of four Bumble Bee A-4M Skyhawks doing their thing.
Photograph by Harry S. Gann

Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 158415, VL-2, on on the flight line with a pair of drop tanks Dec. 1978.
U.S. Navy photo, Sgt Cordova.

Dec. 1978: Second shot of Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 158415, VL-2, on on the flight line with a pair of drop tanks.
U.S. Navy photo, Sgt Cordova.

Dec 1978 BuNo 158167, VL-00, sitting on the flight line.
U.S. Navy photo, Sgt Cordova

Dec 1978 BuNo 158167, VL-00, sitting on the flight line.
U.S. Navy photo, Sgt Cordova

1 May 1979 Skyhawk BuNo 160264, #2960.
U.S. Navy photo, Cpl Burnett

11 May 1979 Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 160246, VL-6, waits to take-off as another Bumblebee A-4M prepares to land at Bogue Field.
U.S. Navy photo, Cpl Burnett

Sep 1979 BuNo 158180, VL-01, parked on the Pax River flight line.
Photo by S.H. Miller, G. Verver collection

03 SEP 1979:
Pic1
Pic1
VMA-331 160260 taxiing at Tinker AFB, OK.
AIRFOTO ©Joe Cupido

Date Unknown:
VMA-331 160263,
location unknown.
Werner Munzenmaier via G. Verver

Circa 1979 BuNo 160262, VL-000, parked on the flight line.
Gary Verver Collection

The Last Skyhawk - BuNo. 160264 - 1979
This in-flight color photograph photo shows the last A-4 Skyhawk built. A-4M Skyhawk BuNo. 160264 was the 2960th and last Skyhawk. This Scooter was delivered to VMA-331 in February 1979 and flew a year with these markings before reverting to standard sky gray. The Marines painted out "US Navy" on the aft avionics package and replaced it with 2nd MAW. This Bantam Bomber - BuNo. 160264 is currently with the Command Museum at MCAS Miramar (San Diego, CA).
Harry S. Gann took this picture in 1979, on a pre-delivery test flight in the vicinity of Palmdale, California.

APR 1980 Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 158180, VL-01, parked on the line.
Rob Mignard

MAY 1980 Skyhawk BuNo 160254, VL-4, assigned to Major Yassimini, parked on the ramp at the Crossroads of the Navy.
Rob Mignard

May 1980 BuNo 158180, VL-01, parked on the flight line. Note the plane captain checking the starboard intake.
Gary Verver Collection

May 1980 BuNo 158185, VL-28, parked beneath the hangar "think" sign.
Gary Verver Collection

May 1980 BuNo 160250, VL-10, parked in the hangar.
Gary Verver Collection

May 1980 BuNo 160262, VL-000, parked in the hangar with a pair of drop tanks next to Bumblebee Skyhawk BuNo 159415.
Gary Verver Collection

May 1980 BuNo 160263, VL-3, parked in the hangar.
Gary Verver Collection

MAY 1980: BuNo 160254, VL-4, assigned to Major Yassimini, parked on the ramp at the Crossroads of the Navy.
Rob Mignard

Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 158161, tail code VL, as she taxies by the photographer.
Dr. C.A. "Sketch" Eddy

25 JUL 1981: Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 160243, VL-17, and BuNo 160246, VL-01 parked on the ramp.
Dr. C.A. "Sketch" Eddy

25 JUL 1981: Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 160243, VL-17, parked on the ramp.
Dr. C.A. "Sketch" Eddy

25 JUL 1981: Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 160243, VL-17, and BuNo 160246, VL-01 parked on the ramp.
Dr. C.A. "Sketch" Eddy

18 AUG 1981: Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 160254, VL-14, as she taxies away from the photographer.
Dr. C.A. "Sketch" Eddy

1981: Bumblebees Skyhawk BuNo 160042, VL-6, parked on the ramp and painted in the lo-vis gray on gray scheme.
Unknown photographer via W. Mutza

  A-4M Skyhawk BuNo. 160256 - 1981.
Bumblebee VL 6 check his leader in VL 16, to taxi to the NAS Atsugi, Japan, runway on February 8, 1981.
Color photograph by and courtesy of Takafumi Hiroe of Yokohama, Japan.

Sept 1981 BuNo 160258, VL-18, parked on the flight line next to BuNo 160253.
Photo R.E. Kling, Gary Verver Collection.

18 APR 1982:
VMA-331 A-4M BuNo 160259, VL-2.

Photo by R.R. Leader from Gary Verver Collection.

VMA-331 A-4M BuNo 158153 VL-15, undated.
From W. Munzenmaier

Jun 1982 BuNo 158180, VL-302, parked on the flight line.
Gary Verver Collection

BuNo 160260, VL-00, parked on the flight line.
Gary Verver Collection



Sources:

 

  • Harry S. Gann
  • Bob Herrman
  • Takafumi Hiroe
  • Major Maxie Jarrell USMCR-R
  • Elizabeth Johnston
  • Carl Markle
  • Sam Melville
  • Major Fred Miclon USMC
  • Naval Aviation News
  • Lynn E. Savage
  • Lee Jackson
  • Elizabeth Johnston
  • Joe Turpen
  • Tony Redman
  • Captain Frank E. Sturges USMCR.
  • Ray Powell
  • Bill Ezell
  • Cpl. David M. (Mike) MacNealy
  • Norman Patterson

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